New study finds microplastics in 90% of world's bottled water.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) has announced a review into the potential risks of plastic in drinking water after a new analysis of some of the world’s most popular bottled water brands found that more than 90% contained tiny pieces of plastic. 

In the new study, analysis of 259 bottles from 19 locations in nine countries across 11 different brands found an average of 325 plastic particles for every litre of water being sold.

Concentrations were as high as 10,000 plastic pieces for every litre of water. Of the 259 bottles tested, only 17 were free of plastics, according to the study.

Scientists based at the State University of New York in Fredonia were commissioned by journalism project Orb Media to analyse the bottled water.

The scientists wrote they had “found roughly twice as many plastic particles within bottled water” compared with their previous study of tap water, reported by the Guardian.

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FLUORESCING MICROSCOPIC PIECES OF PLASTIC SWIRL IN A BOTTLE OF WATER DURING TESTS AT THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK IN FREDONIA.

Bottled water is marketed as the very essence of purity. It's the fastest-growing beverage market in the world, valued at US$147 billion1 per year.

But new research by Orb Media, a nonprofit journalism organization based in Washington, D.C., shows that a single bottle can hold dozens or possibly even thousands of microscopic plastic particles. 

Tests on more than 250 bottles from 11 brands reveal contamination with plastic including polypropylene, nylon, and polyethylene terephthalate (PET). 

When contacted by reporters, two leading brands confirmed their products contained microplastic, but they said Orb's study significantly overstates the amount.

For plastic particles in the 100 micron, or 0.10 millimeter size range, tests conducted for Orb at the State University of New York revealed a global average of 10.4 plastic particles per liter. These particles were confirmed as plastic using an industry standard infrared microscope. 

The tests also showed a much greater number of even smaller particles that researchers said are also likely plastic. The global average for these particles was 314.6 per liter.

“It's disheartening, I mean, it's sad,” said Peggy Apter, a real estate investor in Carmel, Indiana. “I mean, what's the world come to? Why can't we have just clean, pure water?”

To see the scientific report please visit: https://orbmedia.org/sites/default/files/FinalBottledWaterReport.pdf

So what can be done?  The best solution is to stop drinking bottled water and use a home water filtration system instead.  The Big Berkey Water Filtration System is a good start. And you will save money! It is cheaper to use a water filtration system rather than buying plastic bottles.